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Token Ring Network

Suite Description

The Token Ring Network test suite tests the operability of the distro using a token ring adapter on an existing token ring network.

Execution Frequency

This suite should be used on a pair of systems in every beta during the beta cycle.

The Token Ring Network test suite complements the Network Connectivity suite. The Network Connectivity suite should still be executed on the standard test systems.

Execution Dependencies

This suite has the following dependencies:

Suite Overview

This suite contains the following cases:

No.   Case Name   Blocking
Case
  Estimated
Execution
  Abandon
After
1   Configuration during installation   no   45 min   2 hrs
2   Configuration after installation   no   60 min   2 hrs
3   Short ping tests   yes   15 min   45 min
4   Ping flood   no   overnight    
                 

Revision History

Version   Effective Date   Author/Editor   Summary of Changes
1.0   2002-01-01   Megan Bock   Original suite



Configuration during Installation

This case tests the ability of the distro to identify and configure a token ring adapter as part of the installation.

Execution takes place on system "A".

Environment Prerequisites

Preferred architecture: any i386 with a token ring network adapter
System installed? no
Network configured? no
Interface: n/a
Logged in as: n/a

Steps

1
Purpose Test detection and configuration of token ring adapter as part of the distro installation.
Commands 1) Install the distro on one of the two test systems. Pay particular attention to the network configuration screens. The installer should detect the presence of a token ring adapter (tr0) and, if one is present, an ethernet adapter (eth0).
2) Set the token ring adapter to be activated on startup using the static IP address. If an ethernet adapter is present, do not allow it to activate on startup.
Expected Results System should install normally.
Comments and Tips Refer to the Installation suite for additional information on performing an installation.
 
2
Purpose Test basic connections.
Commands 1) cd /sbin
2) ./ifconfig
Expected Results Standard ifconfig report with only lo and tr0.
Comments and Tips The ifconfig command is normally in /sbin. Use the locate command to find it if necessary.
 
3
Purpose Verify that the computer is communicating on the network.
Commands ping gateway IP address
Expected Results Standard ping results.
Comments and Tips Press Ctrl + C to stop the ping results.
 

Results

System Attempts Pass Pass
w/Errors
Fail Comments
 
 
         
 
 
         
 
 
         



Configuration after installation

This case tests the command-line configuration of a network adapter after the distro has been installed.

Execution takes place on system "B".

Environment Prerequisites

Preferred architecture: any i386 with a token ring adapter
System installed? yes
Network configured? yes
Interface: CLI
Logged in as: root

Steps

1
Purpose Install the distro without network support.
Commands Install the distro on the second test system. As in the previous case, the installer should detect the presence of tr0. This time, do not configure tr0 or allow it to be activated on boot. Do not configure eth0, either, if it is present.
Expected Results System should install normally, but network should not work.
Comments and Tips  
 
2
Purpose Perform post-install network configuration.
Commands 1) Edit /etc/hosts so that it has an entry for lo and for the token ring adapter:
(first line -- lo)
127.0.0.1 [tab] system name [space] localhost.localdomain [space] localhost
(second line -- token ring)
static IP address [tab] fully-qualified domain name
2) Edit /etc/resolv.conf, adding a nameserver line for each nameserver on your token ring network:
nameserver [space] IP address
3) updatedb
4) locate ifcfg-lo
5) Change to the directry named by the locate results (usually /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts).
6) Edit ifcfg-tr0, changing or adding lines as needed:
DEVICE=tr0
BOOTPROTO=static
BROADCAST=
first three octets of static IP.255
IPADDR=
static IP address
NETMASK=
your netmask, probably 255.255.255.0
NETWORK=
first three octets of static IP.0
GATEWAY=
your gateway IP address
ONBOOT=yes
Expected Results  
Comments and Tips  
 
3
Purpose Start the token ring adapter.
Commands 1) cd /sbin
2) ./ifconfig tr0 up IP address
Expected Results Standard ifconfig report showing details for lo and tr0. Details for tr0 should show correct static IP address.
Comments and Tips The ifconfig command is normally in /sbin. Use the locate command to find it if necessary.
 
4
Purpose Verify that the computer is communicating on the network.
Commands ping gateway IP address
Expected Results Standard ping results.
Comments and Tips Some troubleshooting tips:
- Make sure that network script for eth0 is not set to start on boot, and that it does not have the IP address information that is used by tr0.
- View the configuration files on system A to see if there are any differences not accounted for in this test suite.
 
5
Purpose Verify that token ring adapter starts on reboot.
Commands 1) shutdown -r now
2) After system restarts, ifconfig
Expected Results Reboot should be clean and ifconfig should show tr0 active with correct IP adress.
Comments and Tips  
 

Results

System Attempts Pass Pass
w/Errors
Fail Comments
 
 
         
 
 
         
 
 
         



Short ping tests

These tests are taken from the Network Connectivity suite.

Execution takes place on both system.

Environment Prerequisites

Preferred architecture: token ring test system pair
System installed? yes
Network configured? yes
Interface: CLI
Logged in as: user

Steps

1
Purpose Check low-level network services.
Commands ping self
Expected Results Multiple lines of successful ping responses.
Comments and Tips Press Ctrl + C to interrupt the ping results.
 
2
Purpose Test the connection to network.
Commands ping other system
Expected Results multiple lines of successful ping responses.
Comments and Tips For the remaining steps, ping the gateway or DNS server used by the test system.
 
3
Purpose Check hostname resolution.
Commands ping fully-qualified domain name
Expected Results multiple lines of successful ping responses.
Comments and Tips The fully-qualified domain name is computer_name.domain_name.tld.
 
4
Purpose Check hostname resolution.
Commands ping unqualified domain name
Expected Results multiple lines of successful ping responses.
Comments and Tips The unqualified domain name is computer_name without domain_name.tld.
 

Results

System Attempts Pass Pass
w/Errors
Fail Comments
 
 
         
 
 
         
 
 
         



Ping flood

This case tests the ability of the distro to manage heavy traffic to the token ring adapters. The simulation uses a ping flood that is scheduled with the at command at 2:15 AM to avoid hindering normal network operations.

You should obtain permission from your network administrator before executing this test.

Execution normally takes place on one of the systems, using the other system's IP address in the ping commands.

Environment Prerequisites

Preferred architecture: token ring test system pair
System installed? yes
Network configured? yes
Interface: CLI
Logged in as: root

Steps

1
Purpose Create the flood test file.
Commands 1) cd /tmp
2) vi flood
3) Press i to enter Insert Mode.
4) Type the following lines:
clear
echo "Starting count test"
date
ping -v -R -c 1
address > /tmp/results 2>/dev/null
date >> /tmp/results
ping -f -q -c 100
address >> /tmp/results 2>/dev/null
date >> /tmp/results
echo "Finished count test"
date

5) Press Esc :wq.
Expected Results File will be created.
Comments and Tips Explanation of the script, line by line:
 
* clear -- Clear the screen to make it easier to view the interim results
 
* echo "Starting count test" -- Notify tester that the script has executed
 
* date -- Print starting time on screen
 
ping -v -R -c 1 address > /tmp/results 2>/dev/null -- Using a single ping, show the route taken; direct output to new file "results" in /tmp and error to /dev/null
 
date >> /tmp/results -- Write a starting time stamp for flood in file "results"
 
ping -f -1 -c 100 address >> /tmp/results 2>/dev/null -- Execute the ping flood, writing output to file "results" and error to /dev/null
 
date >> /tmp/results -- Write ending time stamp for flood in file "results"
 
* date -- Print ending time on screen
 
* echo "Finished count test" -- Notify tester that the script has finished
 
Commands marked with * are ones used only to determine the flood count.
 
2
Purpose Determine the flood count that approximates 15 minutes of testing.
Commands 1) cd ..
2) ./tmp/flood
3) Wait until Finished appears.
4) Compare the starting and ending times.
5) Edit flood, increasing the -c (count) integer in the second ping command by 10x.
6) Repeat this process until you have a start/end time difference of at least 2 minutes.
7) Edit flood one more time, multiplying the ping count as needed to bring the start/end time difference to approximately 15 minutes.
Expected Results Each execution of flood should clear the screen and display "Starting count test", the date and time, "Ending count test" and the date and time again before returning the prompt.
Comments and Tips  
 
3
Purpose Execute the ping flood.
Commands 1) cd /tmp
2) at -f flood 0215
Expected Results The at command may return a message that indicates order of execution. It will return a confirmation that includes a job number and the time and date the job will execute.
Comments and Tips The echo line in flood will have no effect when the script is executed by at. The other commands should execute properly, however.
 
4
Purpose View the results of the ping flood.
Commands 1) cd /tmp
2) cat results
Expected Results Ping results: (1) route; (2) statistics from route -- 1 packet; (3) date and time; (4) statistics from flood -- multiple packets; (5) date and time.
Comments and Tips  
 

Results

System Attempts Pass Pass
w/Errors
Fail Comments
 
 
         
 
 
         
 
 
         

 


 

Legal Information

The information included in this test instruction document is provided AS IS without warranty of any kind. IBM EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ANY WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IBM does not warrant any results or performance measurements obtained. Any information concerning IBM products was written for IBM products offered in the U.S.A. IBM may not offer the products, services or features discussed in this document in other countries, and the information is subject to change without notice. The information in this document relating to Linux is provided as a convenience to Linux users, and IBM makes no warranty or representation, express or implied, with respect to the accuracy and completeness of the information, and assumes no responsibility for any errors, which may appear in the document. Any performance or test data contained herein was determined in a controlled test environment. Therefore, the results obtained in other operating environments may vary. No license, express or implied, to any intellectual property is granted by this document. IBM may make improvements and/or changes in product(s) and/or programs described in this publication at any time without notice.

Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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